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About Deviant Artist Arrik KimMale/United States Recent Activity
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Ice Bear by carvenaked
Ice Bear
For the third time I volunteered to carve ice at the Putnam Fire and Ice festival, Carly Martin's place, Silver Circle Gallery >of which I am a member<sponsered the 300 pound block of ice. The day came and it was a cold cold day. Being the third time , with two other blocks 'under my belt', I decided to keep it simple. This time I only took a half dozen tools and this carving used only three. The workhorse is a long handled one and a half inch socket chisel, basically a small 'slick', and with that one tool the entire bear was roughed out and proportioned. Now many others used power tools, namely grinders and chainsaws but when the ice literally 'jumps' out of the way under a sharp chisel there seems little point to rush things. Some of the newer carver volunteers were provided small hand chisels by the sponsor of the event and I truly felt for them. In the past I have made use of a two inch gouge but why carry two heavy cutters when one will do? One did fine. I cut it in slowly, on my phone I had a handful of reference photos which were referred to here and there. I quick as I could, cut through the block to free the legs and establish the shoulders and ground, and once that is done then small chips are made with long carressing chisel strokes as one walks around to round out the lines. Now the entire thing was cut with one chisel and a pile of ice chips on the ground are testiment to how easily it carves but a bear,has to have personality. Two small palm chisels took care of that, a small gouge and a small skewed chisel, both razor sharp were used to detail the eyes and nose and mouth. Simple things taking only tiny flecks of ice, like the cleft of the nose and angle of the eye and lid, do so much more to bring the bear to life than all the pounds of chips cut in roughing and accordingly this is where the real time is taken. Once it had a face it seemed too nice so of course claws were cut into each foot, sharp ones at that each made by a few tiny chips.. and then the deed was done. I hung out for a few and took a walk to see what other carvers were doing. Stopped into the gallery to chug a beer, I think it was a Narraganset tall boy, then it was off to the new house we are building to sit in front of a fire and eat Pizza with my family. I learned later I won an award! Good fun had by all.
    Now the whole carving took three hours so the word like 'slow' and prases like 'real time' are relative, ice carvings by nature are quick to make and quick to leave this world and if the material was wood, then even with chainsaw it would have taken a full day or two to reach the exact same form. A three hundred pound block of wood would be two or even three times larger depending on the wood.
  If they do it again next year I will too most likely. One of the carvers did a nude which I wanted to do but was goaded into 'not' doing by some who stress the family nature of the event. Mothers of America at work keeping the streets safe for the little ones who might be wrecked for all time by site of a nude. Heck, maybe next time a nude 'ice queen!'references for that abound!
  
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Hitching a Ride by carvenaked
Hitching a Ride
Here is a playful carving made from a section of pine board measuring 24" wide x 12" high x 2.5" front to back.
  It is vacation time again, back to Holden Beach NC for a week of fun, sun, living large. It is a well needed rest, I'm still working on the new dream house seven days a week.. four years now the project has gone on. My web store is closed, and I am only doing the smallest amount of work to keep lines open for the future... I really wanted to spend a few days carving and here is the result of three and a half of them. 
 Dolphins cruise the coast pretty much daily though I did not see one this trip, but I have carved them before so when on auto pilot it is good to be covering familiar territory, I've carved mermaids before too, and I've carved a girl or two. Throw it in a blender.. mix it up and spill it onto a board and here is what you get. Is it wrong to keep working on familiar loved themes? Of course not! It is all for fun and to those who seek profoundness in every knife cut I say check your blood pressure and take a chill pill. >always works for me<
 Anyways, to give the carving some depth, the form of the waves starts fullest in the lower left corner and recedes to nothing at the top right.. the Dolphin is fullest at the top right and recedes into the waves toward the left. To give the board some illusion of  'real life three d' form the horizon line was cut in fully, areas were cut deeply and away to let light in, for example the dolphins tail, the mermaids head are fully relieved.. Other creatures were added for some complexity, a fish jumping out of the way, a couple other dolphins to give it perspective. While at a glance it is representational there is a good bit of abstraction going on here, the complexity helps keep one from dwelling on all the little.. let's call them "inconsistancies'.
The picture may be too bright to see another little trick going on.. the board being pine, was blue stained throughout the sapwood. By arranging the heart side front and cutting the lead dolphin into the whiter heart wood, then cutting away the background right into the fungus colored sapwood, a greater contrast emerged which in some light, is really a key element. Leaving the front plane perfectly flat, and representing a water line cut makes the statement that this is a 'section' cut and this makes the water seem more fluid where the loose chisel marks run as they will..
 Now standing back and scanning the work a dozen things come to mind.. some marks in the water could be routed more gracefully, the little fish fleeing is missing a key lower fin.. the mermaids tail is a little too 'square to name a few... but all in all, it is a playful thing and I cleaned up the little chips and deepened the lines.. partially sanded the rounder forms and called it a day. Next up.. an interpretation of Capt'n Ahab! Ahhh... the sun the wind and the waves.. 
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Seems like forever since I wrote an entry.. a couple of pen pals have been keeping me busy.. and these days I am on the biggest 'art' project of my 50 plus year old life. I'm building my dream home. 
 I want to take a moment to recognize David Moore. He was the gentleman who I started to shoot nudes with some 17 years ago. He passed away this August after a long battle with a degenerative back injury that slowly chair bound him over the last three years. He had other issues as well but he kept pushing through. We hadn't done much lately but we arranged to do a shoot in August. The day of the shoot he was suddenly unavailable to me or the model which was odd and frustrating.. I called and left messages, as did the model who made it to right outside his door! I figured it was on him to get back to me. He never did. It turned out that he died just a day or so later. He was Seventy and last year when he turned that he looked at me and said he never thought he'd make it. 
  I met David at a bar called Velvet that used to be in Hartford across from the train station. There was a fetish night and I was asked  to bring in some erotic art. I set up near the door. The music was industrial techno rock, the crowd was good, lots of odd and cool things to see, lots of hotties to 'study'. I wandered into the back of the club and there was this white haired and bearded guy selling 3.5 x 5 and 5 x 7 prints of nude ladies and semi nudes. He had many shots of gothy stuff.. outfits, fake blood.. I purchased four prints for ten dollars each and later matted them together. We talked for a few.. he wandered up front to see my art and by the nights end we were kind of friends and had agreed to shoot a model together. 
 In the years after, we shot over fifty ladies, many were free models that Dave convinced to pose from meetings on the street..  as the years passed we shot more and more 'pro' models he met on various websites. He was tireless in his search for models. A few seemed to feel that Dave had misrepresented himself.. but it was nothing more than him 'selling' the idea, with his never ending zest, that the pictures would lead to places that they in fact seldom did. I , as a wood carver had no illusions of the worth of what we were doing, it was for fun and for study. Most ladies we shot , and thanked, and off they went one way, off we went another.. but as one might expect some relationships were formed, several of the ladies I met through Dave became good friends who I photographed over and over and still stay in contact with to this day. 
  Dave was a little odd in some ways but when he took you as his friend he would give you the shirt off his back. He would constantly call and write telling me about some new site I had to join.. some new show I had to submit to.. some new software that made every other thing obsolete. He talked me into joining devart which I did and still enjoy. He convinced me to try to join model mayhem but when I did I was rejected!  I always think of myself as a dreamer... but Dave Moore... now there was a man who's dreams were bigger than the man and who I imagine, right up to his last day, dulled with pain killers still dreamed of being discovered and of taking that one picture that would launch him. It was with that kind of attitude that his pictures slowly changed from nude studies to manipulated abstractions. I was literally stunned speechless the day Tia, a mutual friend, called me and told me of his death. I felt realy shitty about myself for not following up after the botched shoot day. Dave would tell me about his back and aplogize for his emails being unreadable at times because of the heavy medications but he was stoic in one sense for I never knew how close the end was for him.
 
 Some of the times and things I'll never forget, shared with Dave..
 The trips to NYC. 
 Dave had all kinds of beliefs about ghosts, afterlife, death.. these were what we spoke of when we drove. The three or four hour rides were long debates that left me tired and left Dave frustrated as he felt his views were unquestionable. He would always say"you'll see!'. On one particular trip to NYC, we were off to an opening at the 'Subculture gallery' where we both were members. Dave had come in on my recomendation but didn't quite fit the crowd.. but on one trip in 98 or 99, we took down a lady who had modeled for Dave many times and who he felt quite close too. The night was fun, dinner at Umberto's house of clams, the gallery reception.. Hanging with the other starving artists there.. when it was time to go the model was no where to be found and Dave and I milled around outside after wondering what to do. We were about to leave figuring she was on her own when she shows up. so we went for the car, in those days I was driving a suzuki samurai.. it was a hot summer night so we took the top off, cruised up to Houston and then onto the FDR going north. The lady was warm.. heck we all were, and she asked me in a matter of fact voice if she could take her shirt off. Sure, I said and without a word she pulled her shirt off,  She was in the seat next to me laying back enjoying it, Dave was in back talking about some new software.. You know how you peek to the side.. trying to look like you are looking straight ahead? I had a head ache and a crick in the neck from it by the time I made it home. I was worried the whole ride home I'd get pulled over! We made it home fine... The only picture of it is the one in my mind!
 The factory..
 Dave used to love to shoot at this old factory and to be fair it was a cool place for a death trap grown over with poison ivy. We tried to shoot every model we could get there till the day came when the owner caught us and threatened to call the police, pointing to the no tresspassing signs all over mixed with grafitti. We never went there again. What I'll always remember was how so many of the models would show up in a mini skirt with beautiful shaved legs and then see the poison ivy they had to walk through! It was always the same.. Dave would say "I don't get poison ivy, and since he didn't we all had to just walk through. Most did. I do get poison ivy and got it many times and more than once I literally picked up the lady and carried her through in the most chivalrous manner. There was rusty sharp stuff everywhere... the cielings and roof were on the floor, all the fasteners were there many pointing up.. a giant boiler the size of a room that looked to be full of asbestos was falling to pieces. Giant wheels, one fifteen teet tall, rusted gears and levers that will never move were now armatures for the poison ivy to grow on.  In one part of the factory there were multi floors that had collapsed and the jumble of machinery and debris mixed with the buildings structure was impressive to see and was almost worthy as a subject on it's own though I never took the opportunity to shoot it.
  The props..
 Dave was always scouring tag sales, junk dealers, anywhere for things to use in shoots. Now some were really cool things I wish I had but mostly it was junk that would be collected and handed to a nude model. Toy space guns, a football helmet. Cheap little oriental decorations. Ripped umbrellas, halloween masks, abandoned rope and nets from the fishing industries. The lense from a broken projector. He had a collection of fake butterflies and rats. He had a box of skulls including a lovely crystal one! If he found an old tossed away wedding gown it became a prop. A roll of discarded metal colored film became a backdrop. I'd get a call out of nowhere asking me to make wooden props.. a cube, fake instruments. A bunch of these ended up stored at my place! Sorry Dave but they gotta go! Wish I had that moon though! 
  Rest in peace Dave, I'll miss you and you won't be forgotten. 

 Otherwise, life is good, the dream home i'm building is on the side of a cliff, seven hundred feet deeper into the woods than my shop. It has a stone foundation made in the bonded veneer style, and will be a very modern looking thing with a steel frame and concrete floors. A rooftop deck will allow me to stand forty feet above the ground looking into woods. I should say 'we' are building, my wife and son are helping on every phase.. Several of my son's friends are helping as laborers and little Sarah who I met through Dave has a bunch of hours in. I hired an experienced stone Mason, Albi Washburn, of Pomfret CT to lead the Stone part of the project. Over 35 tons of stone has been collected, cut, washed and placed along with hundreds and hundreds of bags of both mortar and concrete. Now the last few beam pockets are being cut into the ledge rock and the final concrete elements are being cast. It has taken all summer to get the foundation done so I'm behind on time and over on budget but the wheel is turning and won't be stoppin any time soon. I am not doing any conventional art just now but I'll be back to it in a year which is nothing more than a few blinks of the eye. I've taken two years off of art and am only doing the least amount of paid work I can do to keep my lines open. Two models, Katie Marie and Melissa Trout have stopped by during construction and i'll post a couple of the pictures we took. I have six or more sets of pictures I have taken and never worked on, but this year and next are going to go down as my two busiest years ever so they will have to sit a while longer. I have two years to work on this house project.. one is almost over. We are to move in by next christmas and then I'll have to go back to work! Check scraps to see a few shots of the foundation.
  I am doing the artists open studios tour of Northeast CT again this year.. if anyone is in the area on the two weekends after thanksgiving my shop will be open to the public 10 to 5. All are welcome.
  • Mood: Optimism
  • Listening to: fridge noises
  • Eating: nothing
  • Drinking: coffee

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carvenaked's Profile Picture
carvenaked
Arrik Kim
Artist
United States
I'm a boy who looks like a man... I believe there may be a God...>and there may not be< but you can't find it in a building or in writings, those who say they know, know least of all. Those who look up for answers crush the little ones beneath their feet. Life is a window of opportunity that is closing... I don't think anything lasts forever, a diamond or a persons soul, heaven and hell do exist, but not as other realms, no, they exist right here and now. Hell is getting caught in a lie or watching a loved one die, heaven is harvesting from seed you have sown. I hope when the end comes it is like drifting off, satisfied, after a long days work.

Current Residence: Northeast Connecticut
Favourite genre of music: metal , punk, bluegrass
Operating System: mac OS X
Favourite cartoon character: vampirella
Personal Quote: it is not what you do...it 's how you do it.
Interests

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:icondeserttex:
DesertTex Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2015
Beautiful and diverse galleries. Looking forward to your next!
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:iconcarvenaked:
carvenaked Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2015
Thanks very much!
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:iconselectsplat:
SelectSplat Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2015
Awesome interplay of flesh and wood.
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:iconcarvenaked:
carvenaked Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2015
Thanks! Glad you enjoy them!
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:iconsilvioverderosa:
silvioverderosa Featured By Owner Feb 15, 2015
Thanks for the Fav.
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:iconcarvenaked:
carvenaked Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2015
My pleasure!
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:iconjrputz:
jrputz Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2015
"Happy Birthday"
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:iconcarvenaked:
carvenaked Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2015
Thank you!
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:iconws007:
WS007 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2015  Professional Photographer
Happy Birthday Arrik!
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:iconcarvenaked:
carvenaked Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2015
Thanks very much!
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